Celebrate Women’s History Month in Alexandria

Virtual events occurring throughout March recognize contributions of local women

Pixabay photo by AndPan614

ALEXANDRIA, VA-Women’s History Month was first recognized in the U.S. in March 1987, though its origins go back six years earlier. Since 1998, Alexandria has held its own celebration, honoring women who have made significant contributions to the local community. This year, the city is hosting a number of virtual events. Below are brief descriptions of some to be featured.

Lecture on 18th Century Coffeehouse Proprietor Hannah Griffith, March 11, 7 p.m. — Learn how Hannah Griffith used her status, experience and industriousness to make a new life for herself and her eight young children in the late 18th century. After becoming widowed, she operated the prestigious Alexandria Coffee-House, which is one of the buildings that are now part of Gadsby’s Tavern Museum.

New Wayfinding Marker — A new wayfinding marker will be installed at the former Alexandria Custom House (SW corner of Prince & St. Asaph Streets) commemorating the Occoquan Workhouse Suffragists who were tried and convicted at that location, sponsored by Alexandria Celebrates Women.

A New Online Exhibit “Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts” — Learn about Alexandria’s first Girl Scout troops and the important role youth organizations have historically played in supporting girls in their formative years.

Special Out of the Attic articles — Out of the Attic articles will be published on women in early Alexandria history, including features on female business and property owners. Other articles will focus on the role women played in Alexandria’s historic preservation efforts in the 20th century.

Online Spotlight of Julia Wheelock — Julia Wheelock came to Alexandria as a nurse at the Lyceum during the Civil War. She gave a vivid account of Alexandria during the war in her book, “Boys in White, Experiences of a Hospital Agent in and Around Washington.” Wheelock’s career intersected new opportunities for women during and after the Civil War, as she came to the Washington area to nurse her wounded brother, but stayed in the area to work for the U.S. Treasury Department for eight years after the conclusion of the war.

Social media posts highlighting Alexandrian women who have made contributions to the community — Each Thursday in March, Historic Alexandria’s Facebook and Instagram pages will feature Alexandrian women– of different ages, races, and eras — who helped make a difference.

For even more events, visit  alexandriava.gov/Historic

RELATED—Julia Wheelock: Teacher, Sister, Nurse, Author