Gov. Northam Announces ‘Lost Boy’ Craft Cidery in Alexandria

Northam said that the cidery’s opening will strengthen the Commonwealth’s reputation as a top destination in the craft beverage industry.

Image by Mandy Fontana from Pixabay

Alexandria, VA – Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam on Wednesday, May 15, announced that Lost Boy Cider will renovate a 6,000 square foot space in Alexandria’s Carlyle neighborhood for the city’s first Virginia Farm inert-licensed production facility. The traditional and hard ciders will all come from Virginia apples, and Northam said that the cidery’s opening will strengthen the Commonwealth’s reputation as a top destination in the craft beverage industry.

“This investment from Lost Boy Cider, and their commitment to sourcing the Virginia’s apples that make ciders so distinctive, is a reflection of the economic impact that our agricultural and tourism sectors can have in cities as well as rural parts of the Commonwealth,” Northam said.

Northam approved a $30,000 grant from the Agriculture and Forestry Industries Development [AFID] Fund, which Alexandria matched.

Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson said that the city is thrilled to welcome the business, which was announced late last year and will reportedly open in June.

“Lost Boy is a delicious addition to the incredible variety of food and beverage businesses that help Alexandria’s economy thrive,” Wilson said. “We look forward to helping Lost Boy grow and prosper in Alexandria.”

Tristan Wright, the founder of Lost Boy Cider, said that he and his wife, Katie, have been working for three years for the project to launch. The company will invest more than $668,000 to renovate the warehouse space at 317 Hooffs Run Dr.

“It has been incredibly rewarding to have the support of the community, the City of Alexandria, and the State of Virginia,” Wright said. “We have developed an exclusive blend of Virginia orchard-based apple juice with local cultivators and plan to apply the funding we received through the AFID program towards building stronger relationships with Virginia-based growers. As stewards of a long-standing Virginia tradition of hard cider, we cannot thank the City and State enough for their support.”

The Commonwealth is partnering with the City of Alexandria and the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership on this project through the Governor’s Agriculture and Forestry Industries Development (AFID) Fund, which is administered by the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS).

Stephanie Landrum, President and CEO of the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership, and her team worked with the state and Wright to facilitate the grants to make the deal happen in Alexandria.

“Lost Boy Cider joins a strong community of small and locally-owned businesses in Alexandria, and will be a great addition to the Carlyle neighborhood,” Landrum said.

Del. Mark Levine (D-45) said that the cidery will bring a historic flavor to Alexandria.

“Like most Alexandrians, I revere the history of our 270-year-old city,” Levine said. “So it’s thrilling to know that cider made from 100 percent Virginia apples will once again be made right here, just as prominent Alexandrians like George Washington produced three centuries ago and drank in our taverns. I’m confident this productive partnership among the Commonwealth, the City, and Lost Boy Cider will boost Alexandria’s already substantial flair for both history and fine restaurants, improve the growing Carlyle neighborhood, and give tourists and locals yet one more reason to visit and love our city.”